Two more bombs in Schertz, Texas, after explosions in Austin

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Two more bombs in Schertz, Texas, after explosions in Austin

FedEx Facilities outside of San Antonio, and Austin, Texas where two of the five explosive devices were shipped from.

FedEx Facilities outside of San Antonio, and Austin, Texas where two of the five explosive devices were shipped from.

FedEx Facilities outside of San Antonio, and Austin, Texas where two of the five explosive devices were shipped from.

FedEx Facilities outside of San Antonio, and Austin, Texas where two of the five explosive devices were shipped from.

Dina Rama, Reporter

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As one calmly sets foot into the nostalgic workplace occupied by stockpiles of packages and diligent workers, a sense of comfort fills oneself immensely. Nevertheless, this comfort is soon awaken by the unexpected, deleterious explosions of small packages containing minuscule, yet destructive bombs.

In consequence, the injured employees, apprehensive about enduring a similar incident, lingered in their households in search for a different occupations.

Subsequent to a string of two explosions in Austin, Texas, two more explosion devices, one that blew up inside a FedEx Corp. facility outside San Antonio and another found unexploded at a FedEx site in Austin, kept the region on edge Tuesday as the investigation into a wave of bombings intensified.  

“A call about the first explosion came in early Tuesday, shortly after 12 a.m. local time, at a FedEx Ground sorting facility in Schertz. It followed an explosion in Austin on Sunday night, the fourth there since early March in a series of incidents that police have blamed on a serial bomber,” according to the Wall Street Journal.  

A second package, which was found at a FedEx facility near Austin’s international airport, was being examined by authorities, the FBI’s San Antonio office said in a tweet Tuesday afternoon.

The news of the incidents caused authorities to widen their investigation. Junior, Lily Jacobs, expressed her concern for the uncertainty on the location of these devices: “Although this issue is still ongoing, it is the responsibility of police officers to figure out the source of the distribution of these dangerous devices.”

The incident had transpired after a package was dropped off at GoodWill, a nonprofit organization that empowers individuals with disabilities to gain independence through employment, and given to an employee to deliver ” 2 small devices that were artillery simulators that looks like some type of military ordnance. The employee handled one of those devices at which time it initiated,” Austin police assistant chief Ely Reyes told CNN reporters.

Time Magazine had acquired information from The San Antonio Texas Fire Department stating, “the package explosion injured one FedEx employee, who suffered a non-threatening “percussion-type” injury.”

However, two have died and five have been injured, including the FedEx employee, so far as a result from the bombings dating back to March 2nd.

Junior Davie Langer, member of the Coding Club, expressed her expertise through her input in the controversy: “Explosive devices aren’t difficult to make anymore because of the Internet. Yet, we need to prevent the tools from making these explosive devices into the hands of extremists.”

Due to the fact that the item in the package was not an explosive, Austin police assistant chief Ely Reyes told reporters that the recent bombings couldn’t have been related to the previous bombings in Austin.

Nonetheless, the connection between the two current package explosions and previous three bombings in Austin is still unknown as many officials express contrasting ideas based on the available evidence from police authorities.

Despite the small number of deaths and injuries in these incidents in comparison to similar ones, science teacher Mr. Mulroy displayed his concern for the presence of explosive devices in the workplace of a FedEx facility: “Explosive devices are just as destructive as guns and rifles. Therefore, there should be stricter restrictions to produce a sense of safety for workers.”

As a safety precaution, Austin PD Chief, Brian Manley “reminded the community to ‘pay close attention to any suspicious device, whether it be a package, a bag, a backpack or anything that looks out of place’ and to call 911 instead of approaching such items,” reported by NBC News.